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Day 30: Goodbye, it’s bin emotional! This is the last ever photo taken for Phase 1 of The Rubbish Collection. We hope you’ve enjoyed seeing the highlights from this 30 day documentation phase, and that you come back to see Phase 2 when it opens next Friday, 25 July. For more information, see http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/rubbishcollection. 

Day 30: Goodbye, it’s bin emotional! This is the last ever photo taken for Phase 1 of The Rubbish Collection. We hope you’ve enjoyed seeing the highlights from this 30 day documentation phase, and that you come back to see Phase 2 when it opens next Friday, 25 July. For more information, see http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/rubbishcollection. 

Day 29: We’re going back to our roots and have created a blooming lovely photo from the rubbish. We don’t have a compost heap at the museum, but why don’t you create one in your garden at home? Here’s some more information: http://www.bbc.co.uk/breathingplaces/compost/

Day 29: We’re going back to our roots and have created a blooming lovely photo from the rubbish. We don’t have a compost heap at the museum, but why don’t you create one in your garden at home? Here’s some more information: http://www.bbc.co.uk/breathingplaces/compost/

Day 28: Yes we can! Metals like steel and aluminium can be recycled time and again. They are washed, shredded and then smelted into new metal sheets and bars. Your old aluminium can could be a new can again in as little as 6 weeks! Find out more at: www.everycancounts.co.uk.

Day 28: Yes we can! Metals like steel and aluminium can be recycled time and again. They are washed, shredded and then smelted into new metal sheets and bars. Your old aluminium can could be a new can again in as little as 6 weeks! Find out more at: www.everycancounts.co.uk.

Day 27: A bit of blue sky thinking… The Science Museum offices, bathrooms and cafés use a huge amount of paper towels which, for the most part, cannot be recycled. Some councils will take a small amount of paper towel in with kitchen food waste recycling but it’s best to check first. www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/kitchen-roll 

Day 27: A bit of blue sky thinking… The Science Museum offices, bathrooms and cafés use a huge amount of paper towels which, for the most part, cannot be recycled. Some councils will take a small amount of paper towel in with kitchen food waste recycling but it’s best to check first. www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/kitchen-roll 

Day 26: It’s a sign (to recycle more metal!)… These metal letters have been taken out of the Science Museum’s IMAX cinema and will become some of the average 780kg of metals that are disposed of for recycling from the Museum each month. You’ll be able to see what happens to those metals in Phase 2 of The Rubbish Collection, which opens on 25th July.

Day 26: It’s a sign (to recycle more metal!)… These metal letters have been taken out of the Science Museum’s IMAX cinema and will become some of the average 780kg of metals that are disposed of for recycling from the Museum each month. You’ll be able to see what happens to those metals in Phase 2 of The Rubbish Collection, which opens on 25th July.

Day 25: Just when you thought you couldn’t face any more photos of rubbish, here’s something to make you smile! This rubbish from a general waste bag will be incinerated to produce bottom ash aggregate, which is used in the construction of roads. We’ll be bringing back nearly 2.5 tonnes of this material in phase 2, so visit us after 25 July to see what that looks like. http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/rubbishcollection

Day 25: Just when you thought you couldn’t face any more photos of rubbish, here’s something to make you smile! This rubbish from a general waste bag will be incinerated to produce bottom ash aggregate, which is used in the construction of roads. We’ll be bringing back nearly 2.5 tonnes of this material in phase 2, so visit us after 25 July to see what that looks like. http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/rubbishcollection

Day 24: Keep a lid on it! At the Science Museum we want you to leave the lid on your old plastic bottles. By leaving the lid on, the plastic in the lid can be captured and recycled along with the bottle, rather than falling through the machinery at the recycling plant and ending up being incinerated. Not every plastics recycler works in this way so it is worth checking with your local facility. For more information go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/plastic-bottles. 

Day 24: Keep a lid on it! At the Science Museum we want you to leave the lid on your old plastic bottles. By leaving the lid on, the plastic in the lid can be captured and recycled along with the bottle, rather than falling through the machinery at the recycling plant and ending up being incinerated. Not every plastics recycler works in this way so it is worth checking with your local facility. For more information go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/plastic-bottles. 

Day 23: Some bright spark has summoned up the energy to throw out a bunch of old light bulbs. The Science Museum uses a specialist company to crush and separate our light bulbs. The glass, metal and plastic ends, and phosphor powder residue can then be recycled. For more information on how you can recycle bulbs at home go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/light-bulbs

Day 23: Some bright spark has summoned up the energy to throw out a bunch of old light bulbs. The Science Museum uses a specialist company to crush and separate our light bulbs. The glass, metal and plastic ends, and phosphor powder residue can then be recycled. For more information on how you can recycle bulbs at home go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/light-bulbs

Day 22: You don’t need X-ray Spex to see our Polystyrene waste! It comes from protective packaging used in everything from new display cases to our office computers. Polystyrene takes up 25-30% of UK landfill and isn’t widely recycled. There are a few UK companies who have developed processes for recycling it into garden furniture, coat hangers and CD cases but at the Science Museum it goes to incineration to make Energy from Waste. This isn’t quite as wasteful as it sounds as Polystyrene has a very high calorific value and gives out a lot of energy when burned.

Day 22: You don’t need X-ray Spex to see our Polystyrene waste! It comes from protective packaging used in everything from new display cases to our office computers. Polystyrene takes up 25-30% of UK landfill and isn’t widely recycled. There are a few UK companies who have developed processes for recycling it into garden furniture, coat hangers and CD cases but at the Science Museum it goes to incineration to make Energy from Waste. This isn’t quite as wasteful as it sounds as Polystyrene has a very high calorific value and gives out a lot of energy when burned.

Day 21: Nappy waste… time for a change?  The UK throws away over one million tonnes of disposable nappies every year – at the Science Museum on average it’s a staggering 175kg per week! It’s our only waste stream that goes to landfill.
The industry is starting to develop ways of recycling nappies and recovering the plastic to make into new products like garden furniture and plastic fencing panels but until this becomes more widely available our little cherubs will continue to kick up a stink with nappies taking up to 500 years to decompose, releasing the powerful greenhouse gas Methane as they break down.

Day 21: Nappy waste… time for a change?  The UK throws away over one million tonnes of disposable nappies every year – at the Science Museum on average it’s a staggering 175kg per week! It’s our only waste stream that goes to landfill.

The industry is starting to develop ways of recycling nappies and recovering the plastic to make into new products like garden furniture and plastic fencing panels but until this becomes more widely available our little cherubs will continue to kick up a stink with nappies taking up to 500 years to decompose, releasing the powerful greenhouse gas Methane as they break down.

Day 30: Goodbye, it’s bin emotional! This is the last ever photo taken for Phase 1 of The Rubbish Collection. We hope you’ve enjoyed seeing the highlights from this 30 day documentation phase, and that you come back to see Phase 2 when it opens next Friday, 25 July. For more information, see http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/rubbishcollection. 

Day 30: Goodbye, it’s bin emotional! This is the last ever photo taken for Phase 1 of The Rubbish Collection. We hope you’ve enjoyed seeing the highlights from this 30 day documentation phase, and that you come back to see Phase 2 when it opens next Friday, 25 July. For more information, see http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/rubbishcollection. 

Day 29: We’re going back to our roots and have created a blooming lovely photo from the rubbish. We don’t have a compost heap at the museum, but why don’t you create one in your garden at home? Here’s some more information: http://www.bbc.co.uk/breathingplaces/compost/

Day 29: We’re going back to our roots and have created a blooming lovely photo from the rubbish. We don’t have a compost heap at the museum, but why don’t you create one in your garden at home? Here’s some more information: http://www.bbc.co.uk/breathingplaces/compost/

Day 28: Yes we can! Metals like steel and aluminium can be recycled time and again. They are washed, shredded and then smelted into new metal sheets and bars. Your old aluminium can could be a new can again in as little as 6 weeks! Find out more at: www.everycancounts.co.uk.

Day 28: Yes we can! Metals like steel and aluminium can be recycled time and again. They are washed, shredded and then smelted into new metal sheets and bars. Your old aluminium can could be a new can again in as little as 6 weeks! Find out more at: www.everycancounts.co.uk.

Day 27: A bit of blue sky thinking… The Science Museum offices, bathrooms and cafés use a huge amount of paper towels which, for the most part, cannot be recycled. Some councils will take a small amount of paper towel in with kitchen food waste recycling but it’s best to check first. www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/kitchen-roll 

Day 27: A bit of blue sky thinking… The Science Museum offices, bathrooms and cafés use a huge amount of paper towels which, for the most part, cannot be recycled. Some councils will take a small amount of paper towel in with kitchen food waste recycling but it’s best to check first. www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/kitchen-roll 

Day 26: It’s a sign (to recycle more metal!)… These metal letters have been taken out of the Science Museum’s IMAX cinema and will become some of the average 780kg of metals that are disposed of for recycling from the Museum each month. You’ll be able to see what happens to those metals in Phase 2 of The Rubbish Collection, which opens on 25th July.

Day 26: It’s a sign (to recycle more metal!)… These metal letters have been taken out of the Science Museum’s IMAX cinema and will become some of the average 780kg of metals that are disposed of for recycling from the Museum each month. You’ll be able to see what happens to those metals in Phase 2 of The Rubbish Collection, which opens on 25th July.

Day 25: Just when you thought you couldn’t face any more photos of rubbish, here’s something to make you smile! This rubbish from a general waste bag will be incinerated to produce bottom ash aggregate, which is used in the construction of roads. We’ll be bringing back nearly 2.5 tonnes of this material in phase 2, so visit us after 25 July to see what that looks like. http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/rubbishcollection

Day 25: Just when you thought you couldn’t face any more photos of rubbish, here’s something to make you smile! This rubbish from a general waste bag will be incinerated to produce bottom ash aggregate, which is used in the construction of roads. We’ll be bringing back nearly 2.5 tonnes of this material in phase 2, so visit us after 25 July to see what that looks like. http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/rubbishcollection

Day 24: Keep a lid on it! At the Science Museum we want you to leave the lid on your old plastic bottles. By leaving the lid on, the plastic in the lid can be captured and recycled along with the bottle, rather than falling through the machinery at the recycling plant and ending up being incinerated. Not every plastics recycler works in this way so it is worth checking with your local facility. For more information go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/plastic-bottles. 

Day 24: Keep a lid on it! At the Science Museum we want you to leave the lid on your old plastic bottles. By leaving the lid on, the plastic in the lid can be captured and recycled along with the bottle, rather than falling through the machinery at the recycling plant and ending up being incinerated. Not every plastics recycler works in this way so it is worth checking with your local facility. For more information go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/plastic-bottles. 

Day 23: Some bright spark has summoned up the energy to throw out a bunch of old light bulbs. The Science Museum uses a specialist company to crush and separate our light bulbs. The glass, metal and plastic ends, and phosphor powder residue can then be recycled. For more information on how you can recycle bulbs at home go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/light-bulbs

Day 23: Some bright spark has summoned up the energy to throw out a bunch of old light bulbs. The Science Museum uses a specialist company to crush and separate our light bulbs. The glass, metal and plastic ends, and phosphor powder residue can then be recycled. For more information on how you can recycle bulbs at home go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/light-bulbs

Day 22: You don’t need X-ray Spex to see our Polystyrene waste! It comes from protective packaging used in everything from new display cases to our office computers. Polystyrene takes up 25-30% of UK landfill and isn’t widely recycled. There are a few UK companies who have developed processes for recycling it into garden furniture, coat hangers and CD cases but at the Science Museum it goes to incineration to make Energy from Waste. This isn’t quite as wasteful as it sounds as Polystyrene has a very high calorific value and gives out a lot of energy when burned.

Day 22: You don’t need X-ray Spex to see our Polystyrene waste! It comes from protective packaging used in everything from new display cases to our office computers. Polystyrene takes up 25-30% of UK landfill and isn’t widely recycled. There are a few UK companies who have developed processes for recycling it into garden furniture, coat hangers and CD cases but at the Science Museum it goes to incineration to make Energy from Waste. This isn’t quite as wasteful as it sounds as Polystyrene has a very high calorific value and gives out a lot of energy when burned.

Day 21: Nappy waste… time for a change?  The UK throws away over one million tonnes of disposable nappies every year – at the Science Museum on average it’s a staggering 175kg per week! It’s our only waste stream that goes to landfill.
The industry is starting to develop ways of recycling nappies and recovering the plastic to make into new products like garden furniture and plastic fencing panels but until this becomes more widely available our little cherubs will continue to kick up a stink with nappies taking up to 500 years to decompose, releasing the powerful greenhouse gas Methane as they break down.

Day 21: Nappy waste… time for a change?  The UK throws away over one million tonnes of disposable nappies every year – at the Science Museum on average it’s a staggering 175kg per week! It’s our only waste stream that goes to landfill.

The industry is starting to develop ways of recycling nappies and recovering the plastic to make into new products like garden furniture and plastic fencing panels but until this becomes more widely available our little cherubs will continue to kick up a stink with nappies taking up to 500 years to decompose, releasing the powerful greenhouse gas Methane as they break down.

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