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Rubbish that powers homes and builds roads
In this week’s blog on The Rubbish Collection, Curator Sarah Harvey looks at some of the materials on display in Phase 2: the results of sending 30 days’ worth of Science Museum general waste to an Energy from Waste plant.
You can read all about it here.
Image: Phase 2 of The Rubbish Collection © Katherine Leedale

Rubbish that powers homes and builds roads

In this week’s blog on The Rubbish Collection, Curator Sarah Harvey looks at some of the materials on display in Phase 2: the results of sending 30 days’ worth of Science Museum general waste to an Energy from Waste plant.

You can read all about it here.

Image: Phase 2 of The Rubbish Collection © Katherine Leedale

Modern art is rubbish
In the latest of our series of blogs linked to The Rubbish Collection Science Museum Inventor-in-Residence Mark Champkins looks back at Phase 1, while Project Curator Sarah Harvey gives us a sneak preview of Phase 2.
Click here to read the blog. 
Image: The Rubbish Collection Phase 2 - cutlery © Katherine Leedale

Modern art is rubbish

In the latest of our series of blogs linked to The Rubbish Collection Science Museum Inventor-in-Residence Mark Champkins looks back at Phase 1, while Project Curator Sarah Harvey gives us a sneak preview of Phase 2.

Click here to read the blog. 

Image: The Rubbish Collection Phase 2 - cutlery © Katherine Leedale

Day 30: Goodbye, it’s bin emotional! This is the last ever photo taken for Phase 1 of The Rubbish Collection. We hope you’ve enjoyed seeing the highlights from this 30 day documentation phase, and that you come back to see Phase 2 when it opens next Friday, 25 July. For more information, see http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/rubbishcollection. 

Day 30: Goodbye, it’s bin emotional! This is the last ever photo taken for Phase 1 of The Rubbish Collection. We hope you’ve enjoyed seeing the highlights from this 30 day documentation phase, and that you come back to see Phase 2 when it opens next Friday, 25 July. For more information, see http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/rubbishcollection. 

Day 29: We’re going back to our roots and have created a blooming lovely photo from the rubbish. We don’t have a compost heap at the museum, but why don’t you create one in your garden at home? Here’s some more information: http://www.bbc.co.uk/breathingplaces/compost/

Day 29: We’re going back to our roots and have created a blooming lovely photo from the rubbish. We don’t have a compost heap at the museum, but why don’t you create one in your garden at home? Here’s some more information: http://www.bbc.co.uk/breathingplaces/compost/

Day 28: Yes we can! Metals like steel and aluminium can be recycled time and again. They are washed, shredded and then smelted into new metal sheets and bars. Your old aluminium can could be a new can again in as little as 6 weeks! Find out more at: www.everycancounts.co.uk.

Day 28: Yes we can! Metals like steel and aluminium can be recycled time and again. They are washed, shredded and then smelted into new metal sheets and bars. Your old aluminium can could be a new can again in as little as 6 weeks! Find out more at: www.everycancounts.co.uk.

Day 27: A bit of blue sky thinking… The Science Museum offices, bathrooms and cafés use a huge amount of paper towels which, for the most part, cannot be recycled. Some councils will take a small amount of paper towel in with kitchen food waste recycling but it’s best to check first. www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/kitchen-roll 

Day 27: A bit of blue sky thinking… The Science Museum offices, bathrooms and cafés use a huge amount of paper towels which, for the most part, cannot be recycled. Some councils will take a small amount of paper towel in with kitchen food waste recycling but it’s best to check first. www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/kitchen-roll 

Day 26: It’s a sign (to recycle more metal!)… These metal letters have been taken out of the Science Museum’s IMAX cinema and will become some of the average 780kg of metals that are disposed of for recycling from the Museum each month. You’ll be able to see what happens to those metals in Phase 2 of The Rubbish Collection, which opens on 25th July.

Day 26: It’s a sign (to recycle more metal!)… These metal letters have been taken out of the Science Museum’s IMAX cinema and will become some of the average 780kg of metals that are disposed of for recycling from the Museum each month. You’ll be able to see what happens to those metals in Phase 2 of The Rubbish Collection, which opens on 25th July.

Day 25: Just when you thought you couldn’t face any more photos of rubbish, here’s something to make you smile! This rubbish from a general waste bag will be incinerated to produce bottom ash aggregate, which is used in the construction of roads. We’ll be bringing back nearly 2.5 tonnes of this material in phase 2, so visit us after 25 July to see what that looks like. http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/rubbishcollection

Day 25: Just when you thought you couldn’t face any more photos of rubbish, here’s something to make you smile! This rubbish from a general waste bag will be incinerated to produce bottom ash aggregate, which is used in the construction of roads. We’ll be bringing back nearly 2.5 tonnes of this material in phase 2, so visit us after 25 July to see what that looks like. http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/rubbishcollection

Day 24: Keep a lid on it! At the Science Museum we want you to leave the lid on your old plastic bottles. By leaving the lid on, the plastic in the lid can be captured and recycled along with the bottle, rather than falling through the machinery at the recycling plant and ending up being incinerated. Not every plastics recycler works in this way so it is worth checking with your local facility. For more information go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/plastic-bottles. 

Day 24: Keep a lid on it! At the Science Museum we want you to leave the lid on your old plastic bottles. By leaving the lid on, the plastic in the lid can be captured and recycled along with the bottle, rather than falling through the machinery at the recycling plant and ending up being incinerated. Not every plastics recycler works in this way so it is worth checking with your local facility. For more information go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/plastic-bottles. 

Day 23: Some bright spark has summoned up the energy to throw out a bunch of old light bulbs. The Science Museum uses a specialist company to crush and separate our light bulbs. The glass, metal and plastic ends, and phosphor powder residue can then be recycled. For more information on how you can recycle bulbs at home go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/light-bulbs

Day 23: Some bright spark has summoned up the energy to throw out a bunch of old light bulbs. The Science Museum uses a specialist company to crush and separate our light bulbs. The glass, metal and plastic ends, and phosphor powder residue can then be recycled. For more information on how you can recycle bulbs at home go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/light-bulbs

Rubbish that powers homes and builds roads
In this week’s blog on The Rubbish Collection, Curator Sarah Harvey looks at some of the materials on display in Phase 2: the results of sending 30 days’ worth of Science Museum general waste to an Energy from Waste plant.
You can read all about it here.
Image: Phase 2 of The Rubbish Collection © Katherine Leedale

Rubbish that powers homes and builds roads

In this week’s blog on The Rubbish Collection, Curator Sarah Harvey looks at some of the materials on display in Phase 2: the results of sending 30 days’ worth of Science Museum general waste to an Energy from Waste plant.

You can read all about it here.

Image: Phase 2 of The Rubbish Collection © Katherine Leedale

Modern art is rubbish
In the latest of our series of blogs linked to The Rubbish Collection Science Museum Inventor-in-Residence Mark Champkins looks back at Phase 1, while Project Curator Sarah Harvey gives us a sneak preview of Phase 2.
Click here to read the blog. 
Image: The Rubbish Collection Phase 2 - cutlery © Katherine Leedale

Modern art is rubbish

In the latest of our series of blogs linked to The Rubbish Collection Science Museum Inventor-in-Residence Mark Champkins looks back at Phase 1, while Project Curator Sarah Harvey gives us a sneak preview of Phase 2.

Click here to read the blog. 

Image: The Rubbish Collection Phase 2 - cutlery © Katherine Leedale

Day 30: Goodbye, it’s bin emotional! This is the last ever photo taken for Phase 1 of The Rubbish Collection. We hope you’ve enjoyed seeing the highlights from this 30 day documentation phase, and that you come back to see Phase 2 when it opens next Friday, 25 July. For more information, see http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/rubbishcollection. 

Day 30: Goodbye, it’s bin emotional! This is the last ever photo taken for Phase 1 of The Rubbish Collection. We hope you’ve enjoyed seeing the highlights from this 30 day documentation phase, and that you come back to see Phase 2 when it opens next Friday, 25 July. For more information, see http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/rubbishcollection. 

Day 29: We’re going back to our roots and have created a blooming lovely photo from the rubbish. We don’t have a compost heap at the museum, but why don’t you create one in your garden at home? Here’s some more information: http://www.bbc.co.uk/breathingplaces/compost/

Day 29: We’re going back to our roots and have created a blooming lovely photo from the rubbish. We don’t have a compost heap at the museum, but why don’t you create one in your garden at home? Here’s some more information: http://www.bbc.co.uk/breathingplaces/compost/

Day 28: Yes we can! Metals like steel and aluminium can be recycled time and again. They are washed, shredded and then smelted into new metal sheets and bars. Your old aluminium can could be a new can again in as little as 6 weeks! Find out more at: www.everycancounts.co.uk.

Day 28: Yes we can! Metals like steel and aluminium can be recycled time and again. They are washed, shredded and then smelted into new metal sheets and bars. Your old aluminium can could be a new can again in as little as 6 weeks! Find out more at: www.everycancounts.co.uk.

Day 27: A bit of blue sky thinking… The Science Museum offices, bathrooms and cafés use a huge amount of paper towels which, for the most part, cannot be recycled. Some councils will take a small amount of paper towel in with kitchen food waste recycling but it’s best to check first. www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/kitchen-roll 

Day 27: A bit of blue sky thinking… The Science Museum offices, bathrooms and cafés use a huge amount of paper towels which, for the most part, cannot be recycled. Some councils will take a small amount of paper towel in with kitchen food waste recycling but it’s best to check first. www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/kitchen-roll 

Day 26: It’s a sign (to recycle more metal!)… These metal letters have been taken out of the Science Museum’s IMAX cinema and will become some of the average 780kg of metals that are disposed of for recycling from the Museum each month. You’ll be able to see what happens to those metals in Phase 2 of The Rubbish Collection, which opens on 25th July.

Day 26: It’s a sign (to recycle more metal!)… These metal letters have been taken out of the Science Museum’s IMAX cinema and will become some of the average 780kg of metals that are disposed of for recycling from the Museum each month. You’ll be able to see what happens to those metals in Phase 2 of The Rubbish Collection, which opens on 25th July.

Day 25: Just when you thought you couldn’t face any more photos of rubbish, here’s something to make you smile! This rubbish from a general waste bag will be incinerated to produce bottom ash aggregate, which is used in the construction of roads. We’ll be bringing back nearly 2.5 tonnes of this material in phase 2, so visit us after 25 July to see what that looks like. http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/rubbishcollection

Day 25: Just when you thought you couldn’t face any more photos of rubbish, here’s something to make you smile! This rubbish from a general waste bag will be incinerated to produce bottom ash aggregate, which is used in the construction of roads. We’ll be bringing back nearly 2.5 tonnes of this material in phase 2, so visit us after 25 July to see what that looks like. http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/rubbishcollection

Day 24: Keep a lid on it! At the Science Museum we want you to leave the lid on your old plastic bottles. By leaving the lid on, the plastic in the lid can be captured and recycled along with the bottle, rather than falling through the machinery at the recycling plant and ending up being incinerated. Not every plastics recycler works in this way so it is worth checking with your local facility. For more information go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/plastic-bottles. 

Day 24: Keep a lid on it! At the Science Museum we want you to leave the lid on your old plastic bottles. By leaving the lid on, the plastic in the lid can be captured and recycled along with the bottle, rather than falling through the machinery at the recycling plant and ending up being incinerated. Not every plastics recycler works in this way so it is worth checking with your local facility. For more information go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/plastic-bottles. 

Day 23: Some bright spark has summoned up the energy to throw out a bunch of old light bulbs. The Science Museum uses a specialist company to crush and separate our light bulbs. The glass, metal and plastic ends, and phosphor powder residue can then be recycled. For more information on how you can recycle bulbs at home go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/light-bulbs

Day 23: Some bright spark has summoned up the energy to throw out a bunch of old light bulbs. The Science Museum uses a specialist company to crush and separate our light bulbs. The glass, metal and plastic ends, and phosphor powder residue can then be recycled. For more information on how you can recycle bulbs at home go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/light-bulbs

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