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Day 25: Just when you thought you couldn’t face any more photos of rubbish, here’s something to make you smile! This rubbish from a general waste bag will be incinerated to produce bottom ash aggregate, which is used in the construction of roads. We’ll be bringing back nearly 2.5 tonnes of this material in phase 2, so visit us after 25 July to see what that looks like. http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/rubbishcollection

Day 25: Just when you thought you couldn’t face any more photos of rubbish, here’s something to make you smile! This rubbish from a general waste bag will be incinerated to produce bottom ash aggregate, which is used in the construction of roads. We’ll be bringing back nearly 2.5 tonnes of this material in phase 2, so visit us after 25 July to see what that looks like. http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/rubbishcollection

Day 24: Keep a lid on it! At the Science Museum we want you to leave the lid on your old plastic bottles. By leaving the lid on, the plastic in the lid can be captured and recycled along with the bottle, rather than falling through the machinery at the recycling plant and ending up being incinerated. Not every plastics recycler works in this way so it is worth checking with your local facility. For more information go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/plastic-bottles. 

Day 24: Keep a lid on it! At the Science Museum we want you to leave the lid on your old plastic bottles. By leaving the lid on, the plastic in the lid can be captured and recycled along with the bottle, rather than falling through the machinery at the recycling plant and ending up being incinerated. Not every plastics recycler works in this way so it is worth checking with your local facility. For more information go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/plastic-bottles. 

Day 23: Some bright spark has summoned up the energy to throw out a bunch of old light bulbs. The Science Museum uses a specialist company to crush and separate our light bulbs. The glass, metal and plastic ends, and phosphor powder residue can then be recycled. For more information on how you can recycle bulbs at home go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/light-bulbs

Day 23: Some bright spark has summoned up the energy to throw out a bunch of old light bulbs. The Science Museum uses a specialist company to crush and separate our light bulbs. The glass, metal and plastic ends, and phosphor powder residue can then be recycled. For more information on how you can recycle bulbs at home go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/light-bulbs

Day 22: You don’t need X-ray Spex to see our Polystyrene waste! It comes from protective packaging used in everything from new display cases to our office computers. Polystyrene takes up 25-30% of UK landfill and isn’t widely recycled. There are a few UK companies who have developed processes for recycling it into garden furniture, coat hangers and CD cases but at the Science Museum it goes to incineration to make Energy from Waste. This isn’t quite as wasteful as it sounds as Polystyrene has a very high calorific value and gives out a lot of energy when burned.

Day 22: You don’t need X-ray Spex to see our Polystyrene waste! It comes from protective packaging used in everything from new display cases to our office computers. Polystyrene takes up 25-30% of UK landfill and isn’t widely recycled. There are a few UK companies who have developed processes for recycling it into garden furniture, coat hangers and CD cases but at the Science Museum it goes to incineration to make Energy from Waste. This isn’t quite as wasteful as it sounds as Polystyrene has a very high calorific value and gives out a lot of energy when burned.

Day 21: Nappy waste… time for a change?  The UK throws away over one million tonnes of disposable nappies every year – at the Science Museum on average it’s a staggering 175kg per week! It’s our only waste stream that goes to landfill.
The industry is starting to develop ways of recycling nappies and recovering the plastic to make into new products like garden furniture and plastic fencing panels but until this becomes more widely available our little cherubs will continue to kick up a stink with nappies taking up to 500 years to decompose, releasing the powerful greenhouse gas Methane as they break down.

Day 21: Nappy waste… time for a change?  The UK throws away over one million tonnes of disposable nappies every year – at the Science Museum on average it’s a staggering 175kg per week! It’s our only waste stream that goes to landfill.

The industry is starting to develop ways of recycling nappies and recovering the plastic to make into new products like garden furniture and plastic fencing panels but until this becomes more widely available our little cherubs will continue to kick up a stink with nappies taking up to 500 years to decompose, releasing the powerful greenhouse gas Methane as they break down.

Day 20: Paper and card are some of the biggest waste streams at the ScienceMuseum. By our own calculation, over the 30 day documentation period we will have seen around 7 to 8 tonnes of paper and card, mostly from our shops and kitchens. Our retail team reuse what they can but most goes to be recycled into new packaging materials. 
Want to see what 7.5 tonnes of recycled paper and card looks like? Visit us after 25th July for phase 2 of The Rubbish Collection. Find out more via www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/rubbishcollection

Day 20: Paper and card are some of the biggest waste streams at the ScienceMuseum. By our own calculation, over the 30 day documentation period we will have seen around 7 to 8 tonnes of paper and card, mostly from our shops and kitchens. Our retail team reuse what they can but most goes to be recycled into new packaging materials.

Want to see what 7.5 tonnes of recycled paper and card looks like? Visit us after 25th July for phase 2 of The Rubbish Collection. Find out more via www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/rubbishcollection

Day 19: PRIVATE AND CONFIDENTIAL! Shredding paper is the best way to keep your private documents private but it’s not so easy to recycle because it falls through the machinery or gets stuck in recycling plants. It could be used as a cosy bed for your favourite hamster but check the ink isn’t toxic first!  For more tips go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/paper.

Day 19: PRIVATE AND CONFIDENTIAL! Shredding paper is the best way to keep your private documents private but it’s not so easy to recycle because it falls through the machinery or gets stuck in recycling plants. It could be used as a cosy bed for your favourite hamster but check the ink isn’t toxic first!  For more tips go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/paper.

Day 18:The Science Museum offices have crossed the final frontier of recycling and are now separating food waste for composting! This will soon be rolled out across the Museum to cover all cafes and restaurants and we estimate this could cut the volume of rubbish going to incineration by almost half. Food for thought!

Day 18:The Science Museum offices have crossed the final frontier of recycling and are now separating food waste for composting! This will soon be rolled out across the Museum to cover all cafes and restaurants and we estimate this could cut the volume of rubbish going to incineration by almost half. Food for thought!

Day 17: No diggity, I got to bag it up… But do you really need to use that plastic bag? It takes between 100-500 years for a plastic bag to disintegrate (depending on the type of plastic) and today, Thursday 3rd July, is International Bag Free day so try to remember your long life bag today! www.plasticbagfreeday.org 

Day 17: No diggity, I got to bag it up… But do you really need to use that plastic bag? It takes between 100-500 years for a plastic bag to disintegrate (depending on the type of plastic) and today, Thursday 3rd July, is International Bag Free day so try to remember your long life bag today! www.plasticbagfreeday.org 

Day 16: Ever wondered where the office cutlery mysteriously disappears to? Well we’ve found the answer; with a mountain of various cutlery, bowls, mugs and other tableware reappearing from the dark depths of the bins.

Day 16: Ever wondered where the office cutlery mysteriously disappears to? Well we’ve found the answer; with a mountain of various cutlery, bowls, mugs and other tableware reappearing from the dark depths of the bins.

Day 25: Just when you thought you couldn’t face any more photos of rubbish, here’s something to make you smile! This rubbish from a general waste bag will be incinerated to produce bottom ash aggregate, which is used in the construction of roads. We’ll be bringing back nearly 2.5 tonnes of this material in phase 2, so visit us after 25 July to see what that looks like. http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/rubbishcollection

Day 25: Just when you thought you couldn’t face any more photos of rubbish, here’s something to make you smile! This rubbish from a general waste bag will be incinerated to produce bottom ash aggregate, which is used in the construction of roads. We’ll be bringing back nearly 2.5 tonnes of this material in phase 2, so visit us after 25 July to see what that looks like. http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/rubbishcollection

Day 24: Keep a lid on it! At the Science Museum we want you to leave the lid on your old plastic bottles. By leaving the lid on, the plastic in the lid can be captured and recycled along with the bottle, rather than falling through the machinery at the recycling plant and ending up being incinerated. Not every plastics recycler works in this way so it is worth checking with your local facility. For more information go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/plastic-bottles. 

Day 24: Keep a lid on it! At the Science Museum we want you to leave the lid on your old plastic bottles. By leaving the lid on, the plastic in the lid can be captured and recycled along with the bottle, rather than falling through the machinery at the recycling plant and ending up being incinerated. Not every plastics recycler works in this way so it is worth checking with your local facility. For more information go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/plastic-bottles. 

Day 23: Some bright spark has summoned up the energy to throw out a bunch of old light bulbs. The Science Museum uses a specialist company to crush and separate our light bulbs. The glass, metal and plastic ends, and phosphor powder residue can then be recycled. For more information on how you can recycle bulbs at home go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/light-bulbs

Day 23: Some bright spark has summoned up the energy to throw out a bunch of old light bulbs. The Science Museum uses a specialist company to crush and separate our light bulbs. The glass, metal and plastic ends, and phosphor powder residue can then be recycled. For more information on how you can recycle bulbs at home go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/light-bulbs

Day 22: You don’t need X-ray Spex to see our Polystyrene waste! It comes from protective packaging used in everything from new display cases to our office computers. Polystyrene takes up 25-30% of UK landfill and isn’t widely recycled. There are a few UK companies who have developed processes for recycling it into garden furniture, coat hangers and CD cases but at the Science Museum it goes to incineration to make Energy from Waste. This isn’t quite as wasteful as it sounds as Polystyrene has a very high calorific value and gives out a lot of energy when burned.

Day 22: You don’t need X-ray Spex to see our Polystyrene waste! It comes from protective packaging used in everything from new display cases to our office computers. Polystyrene takes up 25-30% of UK landfill and isn’t widely recycled. There are a few UK companies who have developed processes for recycling it into garden furniture, coat hangers and CD cases but at the Science Museum it goes to incineration to make Energy from Waste. This isn’t quite as wasteful as it sounds as Polystyrene has a very high calorific value and gives out a lot of energy when burned.

Day 21: Nappy waste… time for a change?  The UK throws away over one million tonnes of disposable nappies every year – at the Science Museum on average it’s a staggering 175kg per week! It’s our only waste stream that goes to landfill.
The industry is starting to develop ways of recycling nappies and recovering the plastic to make into new products like garden furniture and plastic fencing panels but until this becomes more widely available our little cherubs will continue to kick up a stink with nappies taking up to 500 years to decompose, releasing the powerful greenhouse gas Methane as they break down.

Day 21: Nappy waste… time for a change?  The UK throws away over one million tonnes of disposable nappies every year – at the Science Museum on average it’s a staggering 175kg per week! It’s our only waste stream that goes to landfill.

The industry is starting to develop ways of recycling nappies and recovering the plastic to make into new products like garden furniture and plastic fencing panels but until this becomes more widely available our little cherubs will continue to kick up a stink with nappies taking up to 500 years to decompose, releasing the powerful greenhouse gas Methane as they break down.

Day 20: Paper and card are some of the biggest waste streams at the ScienceMuseum. By our own calculation, over the 30 day documentation period we will have seen around 7 to 8 tonnes of paper and card, mostly from our shops and kitchens. Our retail team reuse what they can but most goes to be recycled into new packaging materials. 
Want to see what 7.5 tonnes of recycled paper and card looks like? Visit us after 25th July for phase 2 of The Rubbish Collection. Find out more via www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/rubbishcollection

Day 20: Paper and card are some of the biggest waste streams at the ScienceMuseum. By our own calculation, over the 30 day documentation period we will have seen around 7 to 8 tonnes of paper and card, mostly from our shops and kitchens. Our retail team reuse what they can but most goes to be recycled into new packaging materials.

Want to see what 7.5 tonnes of recycled paper and card looks like? Visit us after 25th July for phase 2 of The Rubbish Collection. Find out more via www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/rubbishcollection

Day 19: PRIVATE AND CONFIDENTIAL! Shredding paper is the best way to keep your private documents private but it’s not so easy to recycle because it falls through the machinery or gets stuck in recycling plants. It could be used as a cosy bed for your favourite hamster but check the ink isn’t toxic first!  For more tips go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/paper.

Day 19: PRIVATE AND CONFIDENTIAL! Shredding paper is the best way to keep your private documents private but it’s not so easy to recycle because it falls through the machinery or gets stuck in recycling plants. It could be used as a cosy bed for your favourite hamster but check the ink isn’t toxic first!  For more tips go to: www.recyclenow.com/what-to-do-with/paper.

Day 18:The Science Museum offices have crossed the final frontier of recycling and are now separating food waste for composting! This will soon be rolled out across the Museum to cover all cafes and restaurants and we estimate this could cut the volume of rubbish going to incineration by almost half. Food for thought!

Day 18:The Science Museum offices have crossed the final frontier of recycling and are now separating food waste for composting! This will soon be rolled out across the Museum to cover all cafes and restaurants and we estimate this could cut the volume of rubbish going to incineration by almost half. Food for thought!

Day 17: No diggity, I got to bag it up… But do you really need to use that plastic bag? It takes between 100-500 years for a plastic bag to disintegrate (depending on the type of plastic) and today, Thursday 3rd July, is International Bag Free day so try to remember your long life bag today! www.plasticbagfreeday.org 

Day 17: No diggity, I got to bag it up… But do you really need to use that plastic bag? It takes between 100-500 years for a plastic bag to disintegrate (depending on the type of plastic) and today, Thursday 3rd July, is International Bag Free day so try to remember your long life bag today! www.plasticbagfreeday.org 

Day 16: Ever wondered where the office cutlery mysteriously disappears to? Well we’ve found the answer; with a mountain of various cutlery, bowls, mugs and other tableware reappearing from the dark depths of the bins.

Day 16: Ever wondered where the office cutlery mysteriously disappears to? Well we’ve found the answer; with a mountain of various cutlery, bowls, mugs and other tableware reappearing from the dark depths of the bins.

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